WITHOUT BELIEVING BOSSES, BIM WILL BE BORING

By Preston Hite

How can I explain the progress we’ve made with BIM implementation over the last few years, despite the economic downturn? This could sound like a setup for those of us who are BIM guys to give ourselves a big pat on the back. It’s not that at all. I ask that opening question because it’s important for anyone who is interested in working in the BIM world. Guys who come out of college really interested in a BIM career should pay attention to this post. Learn More WITHOUT BELIEVING BOSSES, BIM WILL BE BORING

BIM can make things better when it’s not confusing (Part 1 of 2)

By Aaron Wright and Preston Hite

We BIM nerds like to feel good about our work, and we use bold catch phrases like “build better with BIM” to try to arouse interest from our coworkers. To be sure, we really do believe our claims: We believe that BIM, used successfully, can enable progressive thinking, strengthen partnerships, and bring focus to the expertise of our team members. Learn More BIM can make things better when it’s not confusing (Part 1 of 2)

BIM can make things better when it’s not confusing (Part 2 of 2) BIM can make things better when it’s not confusing (Part 2 of 2)

By Tristan Morgan, Aaron Wright and Preston Hite

The last post introduced the fact that we BIM folks can be downright confusing with our lingo. (And, most of us aren’t being confusing on purpose.) So, these two posts are an attempt to calm the confusion and explain the BIM-speak in plain English. The first post started by defining “BIM”, and followed by explaining all those ‘D’s that get stapled to BIM. This post will complete our linguistic service by defining (in shorter form) several more terms that have stuck to the fan here at Hoar, and are starting to grow in importance elsewhere around the industry. Learn More BIM can make things better when it’s not confusing (Part 2 of 2) BIM can make things better when it’s not confusing (Part 2 of 2)

Hoar’s Advice for Developing Your Core VDC Team

By Aaron Wright, Preston Hite, Charles Bradshaw, Tristan Morgan and Sloan Walker

How do you get to be a leader in Virtual Design and Construction? Is there a formula to follow — is there a roadmap? Vico’s Customer Success Program certainly outlines a regular diet of training and workshops, plus real-life projects to gain experience and “shake the fear off.” But what should your company do to stake out ground in the ever-competitive market for new BIM projects? Learn More Hoar’s Advice for Developing Your Core VDC Team

Hoar Construction UAB Visual Arts Case Study

By Jordan Ross

Using BIM and other technology allowed Hoar to virtually build and resolve issues in 3D on the University of Alabama at Birmingham Abroms-Engel Visual Arts Center, a project with many geometric complexities and design challenges. Jordan Ross discusses this and other lessons learned for improving coordination processes for construction. Learn More Hoar Construction UAB Visual Arts Case Study

Do What Works: A Case Study on Creating Opportunities

By Preston Hite and Nick Miele

Our team has enjoyed the opportunity over the last several years to push the envelope and make strides doing things with BIM technology that not everybody is doing. It’s been nice to get some recognition for that and to tell some good stories about our experiences. But, we don’t pretend that we’re impressive every time, or that every single one of our projects is bathed in high-tech splendor. The reality is that we can’t do everything we’d like to do on every project. But, here is a story about how we determined to get the most out of BIM — with some exciting results — on a current ongoing project that wouldn’t seem on the surface to be oriented toward these goals. Learn More Do What Works: A Case Study on Creating Opportunities

The BIM Epidemic

By Charles Bradshaw

The black plague, malaria, the Spanish plague, HIV, etc. are all diseases that started as small outbreaks and turned into epidemics. They eventually changed the face of the world and helped advance modern medicine. Now an epidemic has started in the AEC industry, one that is spreading at such an alarming rate it cannot be prevented. It started in the late 80’s in the Western U.S., has started trickling into the Southeast and has hit almost every major country in the rest of the world. It wasn’t formally identified until 1992 when the acronym “BIM” was first used in a white paper released by Autodesk entitled “Building Information Modeling”. In 2012, McGraw-Hill’s SmarkMarket Report indicated 74% of contractors, 70% of architects and 67% of engineers had caught the infection. It’s here and you can’t ignore it. Learn More The BIM Epidemic